News for Insurers
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/22/2018

The federal government shut down after Senate lawmakers failed on Friday night to pass legislation that would have kept the government open until Feb. 16 and extended funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program. A Senate vote to reopen the federal government is scheduled for today after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., vowed that the chamber would consider legislation to address the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in hopes of enticing Democrats to vote for the spending bill.

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CNN, CNBC
1/22/2018

The number of accountable care organizations participating in Medicare advanced payment models has grown steadily to 561 this year, according to the CMS, and representatives of participating ACOs expressed confidence in the model. As health care providers take on more financial risk, they are likely to do more to keep their patient populations healthy, says Avalere Senior Vice President Josh Seidman.

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HealthLeaders Media
1/22/2018

A study in JAMA Oncology found use of oral contraceptives for at least 10 years was associated with a 34% lower risk of endometrial cancer and a 40% lower risk of ovarian cancer. The findings, based on 196,536 women ages 50 to 71, showed significant reductions in ovarian cancer risk among women who smoked, were obese and exercised infrequently, while the strongest reductions for endometrial cancer risk were seen among smokers and those with obesity.

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endometrial cancer, Obesity
1/22/2018

Nine million children rely on the Children's Health Insurance Program for their health care coverage, and payments will continue to flow to states during the government shutdown until money runs out. Among health care programs expected to be affected by the shutdown are the CDC's flu-tracking and infectious disease-tracking programs and the FDA's senior nutrition services, but the shutdown will have little to no impact on Medicaid and Medicare beneficiaries, the operations of Veterans Affairs and community health centers, and Affordable Care Act subsidies.

1/22/2018

The advertising agency Stone Ward keeps employee stress levels down through laughter and games, such as regular basketball breaks and trivia sessions. The company provides healthy foods and the flexibility to work at home, and one company maxim is: "Your career is not your life."

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Arkansas Business
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advertising agency
1/22/2018

Harrah's New Orleans Casino uses the American Heart Association's free Workplace Health Solutions as part of its employee wellness program. So far it has led to increased lipid, hypertension and body mass index control among employees in the program.

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The Associated Press
1/22/2018

A study of sedentary but healthy adults found hot yoga did not provide any more heart benefits than regular yoga, researchers reported in the journal Experimental Physiology.

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HealthDay News
1/22/2018

CDC officials said that the agency's flu surveillance program will continue amid a government shutdown, contrary to an HHS contingency plan suspending the program in the event of a shutdown. The CDC also said that the flu hospitalization rate was 31.5 per 100,000 people during the week ending Jan. 13, compared with 22.7 per 100,000 people the previous week, while 10 additional pediatric deaths were reported, bringing the season's total to 30.

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Reuters, HealthDay News
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CDC, flu, HHS
1/22/2018

Young adults with diabetes who participated in the Resilient, Empowered, Active Living with Diabetes program, an occupational therapy intervention, had significant improvements in their average blood glucose levels, habits for self-monitoring blood glucose and diabetes-related quality of life over six months, compared with the control group, according to a study in Diabetes Care. Researchers based their findings on 81 patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, ages 18 to 30.

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Psych Central
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diabetes, blood glucose
1/22/2018

A study in JAMA Oncology linked having a higher empirical dietary inflammatory pattern score, which is based on 18 food groups and evaluates dietary inflammatory potential, with a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. Researchers said higher scores led to a 44% higher risk of colorectal cancer in men, a 22% higher risk in women and a 32% increased risk in men and women together, compared with those with the lowest scores.