News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
8/13/2018

Affection, not just affordability, may motivate low-income parents to buy junk food and fast food for their children, a new study from Stanford University indicates. Interviews with families at various income levels showed that affluent parents can more easily say no to treats because their children are denied relatively little, researcher Priya Fielding-Singh noted.

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Stanford University
8/13/2018

Several pigs shown at the Fowlerville Family Fair in Michigan tested positive for influenza, and about a week later two people became ill with what turned out to be a similar strain, public health officials report. The two people who were infected are recovering, and they are among only four known human infections involving swine influenza in the US this year, with the others occurring in California.

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MLive (Michigan)
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influenza, Michigan
8/13/2018

Research that found female starlings were less likely to mate after eating food spiked with an antidepressant is the latest in a line of research suggesting drugs used to treat humans could affect the health of wildlife inadvertently exposed to the medications, writes biologist Alex Ford. Understanding the links between environmental exposures and health consequences in animals has long been challenging, but advances such as behavior-recognition software and smaller tracking devices will help, Ford writes.

8/13/2018

The complexity of the canine olfactory epithelium and the way it is stretched across nasal turbinates may explain why dogs have a better sense of smell than humans, according to researchers who have traced those structures to a type of stem cell that appears to play a role in the development of the olfactory epithelium and turbinates. The findings were reported in the journal Developmental Cell.

8/13/2018

A study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism showed that 13% of adults who were born preterm with very low birth weights had metabolic syndrome, compared with 10% of those born at full term but small for gestational age and 7% of controls. Norwegian researchers used a cohort of 189 white adults and found a larger number of those born with very low birth weights had at least one MetS characteristic, compared with controls.

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metabolic syndrome
8/13/2018

A study in Pediatrics showed that autism spectrum disorder incidence was 3.78 per 1,000 person-years among children whose mothers received the Tdap vaccine during pregnancy, compared with 4.05 per 1,000 person-years among those whose mothers weren't vaccinated during pregnancy. Prenatal Tdap vaccination was more likely among Asian-Americans or Pacific Islanders, those who were nulliparous, those with at least a bachelor's degree and those who gave birth at 37 or more weeks' gestation.

8/13/2018

Researchers at security conferences reported that signals from monitors can be changed to falsify vital signs and that insulin pumps and pacemakers can be hacked in ways that harm patients. Encryption of network data and authentication would make it harder to attack the devices, said Doug McKee of McAfee's Advanced Threat Research team.

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McAfee, inslin
8/13/2018

Former NHL and NFL players didn't have brain abnormalities suggesting chronic traumatic encephalopathy or early-onset dementia and had similar neurometabolic, hemodynamic, functional and structural functioning on brain scans, compared with those who previously participated in noncontact sports, researchers reported in The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Another study in the same journal showed similar functional or structural brain scan measures and brain tissue injuries between retired contact-sport players and retired noncontact-sport players.

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NHL, NFL
8/13/2018

Researchers from Yale University School of Medicine who used F-18-fluoromisonidazole PET found that individuals with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer who had tumor hypoxia at baseline saw their tumor hypoxic volume increased by up to a factor of 2.7 two days after undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy, which either returned to baseline levels or stayed unchanged at day four, while those without baseline hypoxia didn't have higher tumor hypoxic volume after SBRT. The findings were published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics.

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Physics World
8/13/2018

Individuals with six or more basal cell carcinoma diagnoses had about threefold to sixfold increased odds of developing blood, colon, breast and prostate cancers, compared with peers of the same age and race, according to a study in JCI Insight. Researchers also examined health insurance data on more than 111,000 BCC patients and found higher risk of internal cancers among those with frequent BCC development.

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HealthDay News
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JCI Insight