Semiconductors
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6/20/2018

Scott DeBoer of Micron Technology expects the adoption of artificial intelligence technology to buoy demand for memory chips in what the company calls the "data economy." While various startups claim they have the successors to DRAMs and flash memories, Micron is confident to rely on the 3D XPoint memory technology it jointly developed with Intel.

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ZDNet
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Micron, Intel
6/20/2018

NXP Semiconductors brought out the eight-core S32S microcontroller, meant to work as part of a hardware platform for autonomous vehicles, with sampling scheduled for Q4. Fabricated with a 16-nanometer process and capable of operating at 800 megahertz, the MCU is seen reducing the time needed to develop software for advanced driver-assistance systems and other electronics for self-driving cars.

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Electronic Design
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NXP Semiconductors
6/20/2018

Syntiant, a Silicon Valley startup, is developing an artificial intelligence and machine learning processor intended to enable hardware-accelerated speech interfaces, with sampling expected this year. "We want to make it extremely easy to add voice control to any kind of device," says CEO Kurt Busch.

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EE Times
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Kurt Busch
6/20/2018

A team of engineers at MIT are creating a smart socket system which uses machine learning to cut down on tripped circuits. The system uses neural networks to categorize devices and help determine which detected arcs are dangerous.

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New Atlas, New Electronics
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MIT
6/20/2018

Defining the requirements for edge memory is of utmost importance for its potential applications in artificial intelligence, automotive electronics, the internet of things and other uses, this analysis notes. "The hottest trend right now is AI and everything that’s not data center is considered edge because they're doing edge inference, where optimizations will take place for that," Ron Lowman of Synopsys says.

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AI, Ron Lowman
6/19/2018

Samsung Electronics has reportedly initiated research and development on its second-generation 1y-nanometer DRAMs using its extreme ultraviolet lithography process. Industry sources say the chipmaker will start fabrication of 1y-nm DRAMs with the EUV process by 2020, after Samsung Foundry begins its 7nm Low Power Plus process with EUV for logic chips during the latter half of this year.

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DigiTimes
6/19/2018

Jonathan Bakke of Applied Materials talks about the company's offerings for cobalt-based processes on its semiconductor production equipment, providing the technology for Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. and Samsung Electronics to make microchips with 7-nanometer features. "Since IBM replaced aluminum with copper in 1997, the materials application field has seen little change, and therefore adopting cobalt has become a new major metal change to transistor contact and interconnect in 20 years," he says.

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DigiTimes
6/19/2018

Lightwave Logic acquired the polymer intellectual property assets of Brazil-based BrPhotonics for an undisclosed sum. The developer of photonic devices and nonlinear optical polymer materials adds 15 polymer chemistry materials, devices, packaging and subsystems patents with the purchase.

6/19/2018

University of California at San Diego researchers report developing a method of producing graphene electrodes with 100 times lower impedance, while retaining high transparency. These electrodes are well-suited for neural imaging, they say.

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Electronics360
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University of California
6/19/2018

Zytronic brought out the ZXY500 line of multitouch controllers, meant to work with the company's touch sensors. The new controllers are said to reduce the air gap between the display and the sensor.

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New Electronics
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Zytronic